Can a Man Write a Guide for Women in Technology to Reach Women and Men?

Izenda Content Strategist

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By Bob Pepalis, Izenda
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Each month we take a look at recent technology news to spot the trends and advances in software and other industries. If you spot a piece of news that should be shared or have a comment, send it to me via email.

Women in Technology: A Guide for Men AND Women
A male programmer gives his advice on how to understand perceptions, stereotypes and stigmas that surround women in technology with "Women in Technology: A Guide for Men and Women, a chapter in his latest book.

The founder of Simple Programmer, John Somnez, who's also a life coach for software developers, wrote a new chapter for his latest book on this, and things like why he thinks so many men do stupid stuff like making anonymous harassment posts.

Somnez takes an honest look at these issues to help men and women begin to move past these problems, "as painful and sometimes politically incorrect as it may be." He gives his advice and opinions for women and men to deal with women in technology in this chapter of his book, "The Complete Software Developer's Career Guide."

Read through the whole chapter to find out why he tackled this topic and why he feels a man can offer valuable advice.

Red Hat's Langhi Tells Women to Do the Math - and Science
Women who want to become technologists need to take the necessary math and science curriculum, according to Erica Langhi, Senior Solution Architect EMEA at Red Hat.

Langhi, in an interview with Jaxenter.com that's part of the publication's diversity series aimed at bringing inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to readers' attention, said women need to take this curriculum to get accepted into technical programs such as computer science or engineering.

"An interesting aspect of working in technology is that you become a lifelong learner, and throughout your career, you continuously learn how to do things in a better and innovative way, which is great in terms of never getting bored of your job," Langhi told Jaxenter.

Women in Tech - The Survey
Why does gender diversity remain a challenge for the tech scene even when it offers specific benefits in technology settings according to a study by The National Center for Women & Information Technology?

That's what Jaxenter.com wants to find out, and is asking you to fill out their diversity survey to share your experiences. From this survey they hope to identify what's preventing gender equality in tech workplaces.

Expect Tech Roles to Change in the Next Several Years
What's in the future for IT organizations? A study by Forrester Research says how many people are needed in IT will shrink and demand for data analysts will increase.

Authored by Marc Cecere, "As Tech Management Structures Change, Roles Become More Strategic and Externally Focused" looks at changes for key roles in IT over the next five to seven years.

"Many of the roles, such as architects and developers, will require increased business knowledge, consulting skills and responsibilities that span the enterprise rather than a narrow functional area, technology or business unit," Cecere says.

And he adds that agile methods and DevOps teams will be the defaults.

Problem Solving Might Attract Women to Computer Science
More than three fourths of all girls polled by Google in 2014 said they enjoyed problem solving. That might create the means to attract women to computer science, according to a story in the Huffington Post.

Only 61 percent of the girls said they enjoyed math. Many believe without a strong math background they can't become programmers. But computer science needs problem solving. A good programmer needs more ability with logic than math. Software development, analytics and hardware engineering can benefit from this problem solving ability.

Wonder Woman Introduced Coding to Teen Girls
The makers of Wonder Woman shared a message of empowerment through a coding tutorial in a project designed with teen girls in mind, Freia Lobo reported on Mashable.

Google Play, Made with Code and Warner Brothers teamed up to create a Wonder Woman themed coding tutorial. In the interactive project, girls use introductory programming principles to teach concepts like basic logic, variables and sequences. The principles get introduced through helping Wonder Woman combat obstacles from three scenes in the movie.

Made With Code projects are designed to expose young women to applications of coding like fashion or filmmaking.

Try tutorial here.

Signs Not to Take that Programming Job
We've all been stuck in some dead-end job in our lives, but there's no reason to make a habit of it. Paul Heltzel offers advice in an article on InfoWorld on how to avoid that disastrous new coding job.

He found red flags from the job listing to interviews that present clues on what kind of hell you may enter in that new gig. (And he found some positive signs, too.)

Does that job listing include a large number of technologies? Danger, Will Robinson, Danger! Does that organization lack structure, or will you walk into transition mode with legacy projects still on the table?

If you can't find a personal connection to quiz about the company, watch out for a non-technical founder in over his head, or a small side project they want completed that then ends up in their main application. During interviews, ask questions that make it clear if you'll fit in the company culture. You can put up with some headaches, but certain personality traits may drive you up the wall.

Likewise you want to avoid a sweatshop, so pay attention and learn if they have many contractors and high turnover. Your background may be perfect for the job, but don't let that fool you from mistaking desperation on their part for recognition of your impressive CV.

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