At the Core of Your Being: An Interview with Jeanne Nangle, MA, OD

Julio Montanez

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For years, Jeanne Nangle was an executive coach. But, that particular career did not fit.

So, Jeanne created the term, "soul coach." She focuses on how souls speak to humans. As a soul coach, her work operates from a unique perspective: the soul as the center of our being.

Encouraging people in this direction is critical. Being a soul coach is an important part of Jeanne. Being a soul coach is like a calling.

According to Jeanne, the soul, as the core of our being, is the piece of us that knows who we are. By putting the soul at the center of our lives, we stay focused on what really matters. The soul prevents us from not dwelling on our problems and is the seed of potential.

Julio Montanez (JM): What is a soul coach?

Jeanne Nangle (JN): Over 20 years ago, I heard the term, "doctor of the soul." At the time, I had no idea what it meant. But I thought, "I'm going to do that." That was one of my first experiences with hearing my soul's guidance.

I chose the term "soul coach" because the soul is active in our lives and is attuned to what is going on with us. I coach people on how to hear the soul's guidance, how to meet the soul's needs, and how to fulfill purpose. What life lessons keep showing up? What problems keep happening over and over? That means you have something to learn that you are not learning for some reason.

The term "coach" applies because I support people versus trying to fix people.

JM: What does it mean to be a soul coach?

JN: I help aspiring professionals have greater confidence and clarity and a deeper connection to themselves. The way there is by knowing your particular soul and what it needs for full expression. The bottom line is that each one of us has a soul, and the soul exists to be authentic.

JM: At the 24th Annual Women in Technology Summit, you hosted a coaching circle, "Feeling Confident in Different Situations." What was that experience like?

JN: I loved hearing from everyone in the interactive format. It was great because people opened up and shared with one another, which fostered a great sense of community. I plan to do more interactive formats. In my coaching program, I have a similar format. Once a week, my clients come together online and talk and share what's going on with others. It is validating to gain knowledge from others who share your frustrations and challenges.

JM: What themes do you find commonly block women in STEM professions, or any profession, from feeling confident in different situations?

JN: Needing approval from others, be it peers or their bosses. Obviously, we all want to do a good job, be recognized, respected, and promoted. But, it is a matter of focus. If we focus on doing a good job, it takes the pressure off of needing approval. Focus on doing a good job and let go of the outcome. Confidence comes from having positive experiences. Do what you can to create a positive experience for yourself.

Another is feeling like we have to be an expert so anything below that feels like we're inadequate. Many high achievers carry feelings of inadequacy because of things that happened in childhood—like being children of alcoholics. So, they question themselves a lot.

JM: Your work strives "to empower aspiring professionals to live with confidence, clarity, and connection to yourself." What does it mean to live with confidence, clarity and connection, and what makes this particular message unique and impactful?

JN: I worked for IBM at the start of my career, and I had insecurities and felt disconnected from myself. This is a large reason why I do this work.

There are two areas that create an impact:

1. Helping people overcome insecurities

2. Helping people deepen their connection to themselves, so they'll be whole people with self-acceptance, knowledge, and balance in their life.

JM: If you had one message for the world—a message that you would want everyone to remember and apply to their lives—what would that message be?

JN: To know who you are at the core of your being and learn to love that person.

JM: What would it mean to know yourself at the core of your being?

JN:

1. Knowing life's purpose

2. Knowing lessons that you need to learn

3. Knowing what you need to be comfortable in the world

4. Knowing what you love

5.Knowing what you don't like

6. Frankly, it's knowing everything there is to know about yourself, and the intimacy with yourself that comes from self-honesty.

The soul seems to have a lot to say. Maybe we should listen.

Jeanne Nangle empowers aspiring, high-achieving professionals to have greater confidence by caring for their soul. Jeanne started her career in technology as a sales representative for IBM where she got her master's degree in Industrial Psychology. Jeanne has studied the power of the soul and self-confidence for over 20 years. She is a seminar leader in hospitals and schools, the author of two critically acclaimed books on personal transformation, and Jeanne has helped thousands of people from around the world discover their true confidence and self-worth.

Schedule a FREE consultation with Jeanne

Julio Montanez is a staff writer for WITI (Women in Technology International). He has a bachelor's degree in Political Science and Sociology from the University of Central Florida. Julio hopes to one day be a university professor.

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